Cloud computing is not internet-located storage

In movies and television shows, information technology and cloud computing are often scaled down to fit the story. That magically computed result, that missing electronic file, and that unknown password that will stop something bad or start something good can go from nonexistent to resolved in one brief scene. And for historical reasons, I suppose, the significant computing power in most screen fiction seems to come from a vintage mainframe — rather than a modern supercomputer or engineered system.

There aren’t too many references to cloud computing in movies or on television, but those that we have seen seem limited to the idea that a treasured file or information the hero or villain may be looking for is safe from local mayhem because it is safely stored “in the cloud.” Fortunately, the fact that a movie or television show delivers a very narrow definition of cloud computing as internet-located storage isn’t likely to break the on-screen story or reduce the entertainment value of a production.

Enterprise cloud computing is much bigger than internet storage

At the same time, the fact that enterprise cloud computing is much bigger than internet storage isn’t guaranteed to give cloud a bigger or more detailed definition on the big and small screens. To start, enterprise cloud computing is about the infrastructure, platform, and application services deployed in public, private, and hybrid clouds that support the business. That big beginning could also be part of why it’s easier in a movie plot to point to the internet and call it the cloud.

But if a movie wanted to show what enterprise cloud computing means for business, it would have to go big. A comprehensive look at cloud would have to include the aforementioned themes of infrastructure, platform, and application services along with cloud management, security, integration, development, social computing, mobility, business intelligence, big data, and more. And a discussion about potential cloud challenges would include siloed information, control and visibility, data privacy and regulatory compliance, proprietary architectures, and vendor lock-in.

(Oracle Mag – T. Haunert, Editor in Chief)

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